The 9th Incarnation of ShaunInman.com

So last weekend I had this idea. Every post, link and comment on this site is associated with a point in time. As time passes, these items become less relevant. Links to humor suddenly aren’t funny anymore. Articles about site production techniques are inevitably made obsolete by modern practices. There ought to be some way to communicate that visually to the nomadic Googler who wanders across an ancient article on IFR.

Well, there’s no time like the present and ShaunInman.com/post was born. The Heap, my contribution to this steaming pile we call the internets.

What’s new?

Just like last time, pretty much everything. No more IFR. No more JavaScript. No more Din (!). No more single-pixel diagonal lines. No more tiny gray text on blinding white. No more miniature widgets. No more Movable Type.

Less Web 2.0. More like Web Two-point-No.

What’s left?

One column with notes in the gutter. Greater attention to typographic details like line-length, leading and baseline relationships. Helvetica Neue (or Arial Eue on typographically challenged OSes). Readable content. Thirty-three thousand, three hundred and six 1 KB CSS files.

Come again?

Thirty-three thousand, three hundred and six 1 KB CSS files. One for each day of the year…for the next ninety-one years. Each post, link and comment exists in its own little era distinguished by color. Or not, if adjacent elements are temporally consecutive. Gaps between older and more recent comments come into focus. Seasonal posting patterns are revealed. Older content begins to fade away. You did read the read me, right?

The color scheme of the homepage and other “timeless” pages like Contact and Feeds gradually shift. Imperceptibly, perpetually, like the passage of time. Today the dominant color is olive. In a month it will be something closer to taupe.

I’m still tweaking the algorithms that generate those colors. I’ll eventually work out something that is consistently less muddy but for the time being it seems conceptually appropriate to the idea of decay.

Other notes about the redesign

Comments no longer accept HTML. It’s now Markdown all the way. I’ve mentioned it a number of times before on this site but Markdown is John Gruber’s beautiful, easy-to-write, easy-to-read plain-text “markup” format. I am using a modified version of Michel Fortin’s PHP Markdown (with PHP SmartyPants) that strips all HTML before parsing and ignores the Markdown for headers, horizontal rules and images.

These Links? Again? are now full-fledged citizens of ShaunInman.com. You can now comment on and link directly to individual links.

This is first public use of a new framework I’ve been developing. We’ll see how the server fares with all those layers of encapsulation that make development a breeze—it could be an awful lot to chew on.

Lastly, this is the first time I designed an entire site in the browser before hitting Photoshop—and only to create the icon and button treatments. It may seem that this process led to an overly-simple design but it was really the other way around. I knew going in that I wanted to stay away from micromanaging pixels. Like the colors, I may revisit the details but I think this is a comfortable starting point.

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Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
October 16th, 2006 at 10:05 am
Categories
The Site
About
CSS
Design
PHP
Comments
112 (Now closed)

112 Comments

001

Let it be known that I am in the special club that allows me to comment on this post right now. Eat your heart out Wolf Lovers!

Author
Mike D.
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 5:37 pm
002

Impressive.

Author
josue salazar
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 6:18 pm
003

Everything ages. Your hair gets gray, your skin wrinkles. Things change their appearance over time. Nice idea, I like it!

Author
Benke
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 6:32 pm
004

i definitely dig it. my latest blog incarnation was done the same way, coded first, then designed.

Author
paul
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 6:32 pm
005

Whoah, just whoah. Gotta check out the older entries now! You’re amazing!

Author
Kalle
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 6:33 pm
006

Daaamn. I think I might have to re-read and rediscover your thoughts above; so profoundly interesting. It’s just amazing what things you come up with—Avant-garde! It takes moments and events like these to keep us pushing and experimenting with new processees. I thank you for that.

Author
Sherwin Techico
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 6:54 pm
007

Nicely done, sir. Of course.

Age-dimming (or some other time-based stylistic convention) is something I’ve always wanted to see done on a blog. It’ll be interesting to see how it turns out.

Author
Eric Meyer
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 7:05 pm
008

Aside from the fact that (on the new entries anyway) it’s a bit hard to read (dark on dark text) and in some cases impossible (in the case of some of the sidebar elements) to read this is a really nifty idea!

Author
Keith
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 7:16 pm
009

Now, that’s what I call innovative. I’ll be very interested to see this site over time.

I wonder if you’ll be able to resist changing it for long enough to see the whole timeline through! I certainly couldn’t wait that long… not if I could do the things you do!

Very nicely done. Again.

Author
Chris Wible
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 7:17 pm
010

Terrific idea, Shaun. I’m really excited by the idea of coupling CSS with the timestamps of posts. Bravo!

Oh, and I agree: Markdown rules.

Author
Jeremy Keith
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 7:19 pm
011

This version is amazing, the concept, typography and all the tiny details. Taking back design to what it should be.

I’m feeling like a kid not knowing what to try out next even after more than an hour on safari. Now wondering what you have in mind for Designologue :^)

Author
Simon Zirkunow
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 7:19 pm
012

Holy shit. Is this really happening? Did I really just say “shit”? Yes. This is awesome Shaun. I can’t wait to see how this grand scheme plays out as the content inevitably decays.

Author
Alex Beard
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 7:34 pm
013

Shaun, I love the concept, but Simon I definitely wouldn’t go so far as to say it’s”taking back design to what it should be.” I think it’s a kick ass artistic statement though.

A while back I had my site shift based on time of day and really enjoyed the cocept, but ran into problems with people never noticing. Your giant READ THIS, made me laugh. I also ran into tons of trouble with contrast and not really liking the sites look at certain times of day. The whole thing was based off sunrise and sunset times where I was living. I’ve changed it now to just change based on night and day and am currently working up a little redesign to bring in seasons and some color.

I love your concept of gradually “aging” things though and it’s definitely something I’d never thought to do.

Author
Tom Watson
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 7:49 pm
014

Tom, I didn’t mean “design” in terms of style or technology. I was thinking about something concept-driven with great attention to typography and detail, design that engages the audience.

I love this new version and I like the way it makes me rethink design. I want to see more of that.

Author
Simon Zirkunow
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 8:13 pm
015

Wow, I really wasn’t expecting the reaction to be this positive. I had imagined the return of Goldie Locks from earlier redesigns clamoring, “this type is too big,” or the chlidish, “gee, this looks like shit (literally)” sort of comment (I practically made that joke myself in the post).

Keith: I run my monitors pretty bright (probably part of the reason the old version of the site was giving me headaches). I might need to adjust the text/background contrast some more.

For everyone interested in how this is going to play out you can already see the effects in certain piles or searches.

Tom: I’m certain that I’m not going to appreciate the winter months when my site turns purple and pink. ;) Hopefully, I’ll have some time to adjust the algorithms before that happens. I’d really like to find a way to communicate the passage of time on a scale smaller than an entire day. I think being able to see the relative time between comments— even those that occurred within minutes of each other—would be really interesting.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 8:30 pm
016

I really like the whole idea. Good work Shaun.

Author
Joe Lencioni
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 8:46 pm
017

Shaun, what about things like icons, search buttons, etc.? Will they correspond with the change in colors, or will they remain static as time passes?

Author
Alex Beard
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 9:42 pm
018

Icons are static but buttons change with the rest of the site (buttons are two transparent pngs, nested to allow for the rounded edges, and their hover state is just CSS).

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 9:53 pm
019

I’ve been tempted to take on something a bit more dynamic and less, well, constrained for my own site after reading this post on Airbag.

I look forward to seeing how this experiment comes together. Congratulations!

Author
BJ Vicks
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 10:15 pm
020

Ah, that’s what I forgot to mention! This comment form is pure Airbag. Love the name-email-site-triad-under-the-comment-textarea dealy.

I’m not sure this redesign addresses any of the problems Greg takes with the current generation of “blahgs” or the blog format. It’s still content in boxes. The boxes are just different colors on different days here.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 10:27 pm
021

Woo dog, Inman.

Author
Matt Thomas
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 10:29 pm
022

Shaun, I’m looking at this on my Macbook and it looks much brighter. Anyway, don’t take that as too much of a critisism, I just want to make sure I can read it! ;0)

Author
Keith
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 10:35 pm
023

And by “woo dog, Inman” I mean, “whoa, this is the best typography I think I’ve ever seen on a ‘blog,’ Inman!”

Author
Matt Thomas
Posted
Oct 16th, 2006 10:49 pm
024

An excellent experiment, and an effective way to encourage people to consume the site in context through their browser instead of plain text through RSS aggregation. I’m looking forward to seeing the visuals (d)evolve.

Author
Ryan Stephenson
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:33 am
025

Shaun: Yeah, the purple and pink might be a little rough. It’s you that’ll end up spending the most time looking at it so good luck. I like the idea of making the comments fade out or some such age treatment.

Author
Tom Watson
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:59 am
026

Wow, I feel like the kid who show up late to the party. I really dig the concept of fading out as time passes. I was thinking along those same lines for a project I’m working on, but nothing even close to what you’ve done here. Some of the contrast is a little hard to read for me, but I tend to run my screen pretty low at home.

On typography, very nice. Getting the baselines to line up is pretty damn difficult with this medium. It’s something I miss from doing print.

Looking forward to seeing how this works out over time.

Author
Kevin
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 1:31 am
027

Shaun, I disagree with the notion that “As time passes, these items become less relevant.” In my mind, I see little, if any, relation between length of existence and relevance. Rather, relevance seems more directly related to immediate and potential application. While immediate and potential application of an idea will vary over time, the relevance of that idea may or may not be realilzed at its inception; and the relevance of that idea may or may not increase at some point after its inception.

A few examples to illustrate my point:

Example 1: Paris and Aristotle

“Confessions of an Heiress: A Tongue-in-Chic Peek Behind the Pose” by Paris Hilton, was published May 23, 2006.

Aristotle lived and wrote between 384 and 322 BC.

Between, Paris HIlton’s book and Aristotle’s teachings, which would you say is more relevant?

Example 2: Web Standards

The initial mission and philosophy of the Web Standards Project, is as relevant today, if not more so, as it was when it was initially published in 1998 (http://archive.webstandards.org/mission.html).

With that said, let me close by saying I appreciate your work and I eagerly await your next move.

Author
Justin Barkhuff
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 1:34 am
028

This is outstanding. What a revolutionary approach to designing a site. I love it. How long did you muse on this? Where did the idea begin?

Thank you for breaking the mold. Hopefully this will inspire many others to push the envelope in how we approach design on the web.

Author
Joshua Brewer
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 2:33 am
029

Fascinating stuff - a really interesting way of visually giving age to your older posts. Of course, brand new visitors from Google landing on an old post wouldn’t have a frame of reference, but then you do provide an explanation.

Now then, what we really need to see is Cameron taking this concept with his wicked worn look and gradually wearing out the pages as they get older until they are tattered beyond recognition.

And the best bit about your redesign - the attention to baselines and vertical rhythm in the text. Almost nobody does this, so nice job.

Author
Richard Rutter
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:43 am
030

I’m currently reading this with stylesheets turned off. Why? Because the contrast is freakin’ low that I with my shortsighted eyes hardly can’t read anything at all. The links are not clearly pointed out as links. It’s hard to differentiate between posts. And so on. Also, I have to agree with Justin Barkhuff that the relevance is not automatically bundled with the time it was written, it depends on the subject.

Tt’s a nice idea, nothing more, nothing less. But, in my personal opinion, the realization was done more than bad. Now go on, torture me.

Author
Jeriko One
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 5:26 am
031

That’s brilliant. Bravo, Shaun.

The current state of design on the web needs a swift kick in the nuts. I hate it when trends take over and no one has any original ideas. The design of this site is an artistic statement in the way that punk rock is an artistic statement - minimalsitic and in your face!

I respect you (even more than usual) for having the guts to take a stand and do things your way instead of trying to please the masses. This is after all, your web site.

Awesome statement.

Author
Paul
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 5:36 am
032

What I love the most about this is that you use markdown + smartypants for comments. I’ve been using markdown for many things lately and being able to write comments with it greatly improves my experience as your fellow blogreader.

Actually it’s something I’ve been thinking about since I’m currently working on a propper theme for my movable type installation (those available through the stylecatcher by default don’t please me a single bit).

Author
Chris Hoeppner
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 6:21 am
033

Greetings from Norwood, MA.

Shaun, your concept is absolutely fascinating. Well done. Now let’s sit back and watch as the Interwebs copy you. Mark my words - this will be a watershed moment.

Author
Dale Cruse
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 7:58 am
034

Ingenious! I’m very interested to see how this goes, my first impression when I saw the “new look” was that you’ve gone a liitle bit mad but thats what they say about genious isnt it.

Author
Eoghan O'Brien
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 9:11 am
035

Justin: I would disagree. My words on this site are closer to Paris Hitlon’s (ghost writer’s) than Aristotle’s when you consider lasting impact. And my work isn’t nearly as important to the development of the web as a whole as the Web Standards Project. No delusions of grandeur here. I agree that relevance isn’t always directly related to the passage of time. However, on a personal blog, in the majority of cases, it’s close enough.

Joshua: The idea came together over an afternoon. The basic typographic stylesheet and contrast ratios began their life as a user stylesheet I hastily threw together for a terribly presented online book on C++ I was reading. The decay concept grew out of the .com/post url structure/pun that was initially a throw away comment on how blog content grows rapidly irrelevant. I wanted a site that would look different every day without any additional effort on my part. That idea kind of fell to the wayside as the rest evolved but may return as I revisit the design.

Creating the PHP class to manipulate colors took about another day (support for HSB color mode was essential for the transformations necessary). Building the blogging engine using the new framework took about a day. The rest was massaging and re-categorizing content from Movable Type and figuring out how to transition the directory structure and manage link rot. The biggest headache was taking comments from my old site which could contain some HTML and Markdown and converting that HTML into Markdown for storage in the database. All in all it was completed over the course of a week.

Richard: The worn look would definitely be awesome. For this design I consciously tried to keep the image count down because you are essentially loading a new stylesheet on every page, and sometimes as many as 20 on the list views.

I forgot to thank Stan for the kick in the pants for the typography. I showed this to him earlier this week and he yelled at me, “you know more about typography than this!” And he was right. I had been consulting the Elements of Typographic Style for line-length and size relationships and had completely overlooked baselines and vertical rhythm. It still gets a little thrown off when images are introduced but nothing I can’t work around going forward now that I’m aware of it.

Jeriko: You’re definitely entitled to your opinion. I’m not going to torture you other than to humbly suggest that you adjust the contrast settings on your display. Even with my display on the lowest brightness setting I can clearly differentiate between the text, links and background. Like I mentioned to Keith earlier, I’ll be tweaking the contrast as I go. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 9:32 am
036

Wow. Now this is nice.

Author
Joshua Kendall
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 9:57 am
037

This ‘anti-design’ feels like a retaliation against the many people who use RSS to vew the posts on your site. It’s like your giving up on design on the web and focusing soley on content since a large amount of your audience doesn’t even visit your site.

It’s a stunning display of brutalism and – while industry insiders may love the honesty – it’s my opinion that your general public simply won’t “get it”.

Author
Tim Hettler
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 10:16 am
038

I’m stunned and amazed, really. I read the “read me” all the way through and at the end was excited.

I’ve always looked at web design as an art; this is truly an artistic concept, and I love it!

This is inspiring. :)

Author
Jina Bolton
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 10:34 am
039

Shaun, it’s unfortunate that I was planning to get a ton of work done today, because now I shall spend most of my work hours digging through your site and examining older and older entries. Then I’ll spend the rest of the day grinding my teeth at your programming skills, and wishing that I had spent more time on mine back when it was easy to learn that stuff.

I guess you could say I consider this concept to be at the “Top of the Heap” ;)

Author
Dan Rubin
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 11:03 am
040

I have to apologize for my previous comment - I was reading this entry on my notebook, on which I thought that the contrast was fairly good. Turned out that it is rather poor compared to my home setup. But you should keep that in mind when adjusting contrasts.

Anyway, the point of relevance is still there. Sure, there are entries that are tied to a specific point in the timeline - for example all those entries about the release of Internet Explorer 7, which will probably pop out everywhere on the blogosphere by tomorrow. But why should a funny link be less funny if it is like one or two years old? Why is a resumee about, let’s say World War II (just came up to me) be less relevant if it is just a little bit old?

It is still a good idea, a frequent visitor to your site can identifiy the age of an entry just by looking at the colors. But to tie it to the relevance seems to be just wrong to me.

Author
Jeriko One
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 11:04 am
041

Tim: I think you might just be one of those people who doesn’t “get it” — this isn’t “anti-design” as you put it, and while it may sound like a nice theory to place the blame on Shaun’s feeds, the fact is that this site has been designed, very carefully, and with a ton of attention to detail. It’s going to evolve I’m sure, and it’s certainly different from what we’re all used to seeing from Shaun, but how can you infer that he’s shunning design just because he changes his visual style a bit?

The more important thing here is the concept and the way Shaun is using design to support it. There’s a ton going on under the hood (and I would even call that well-designed, from a programmatic point of view), and the concept relies on color to communicate age and typography to communicate everything else.

I encourage you to examine your definition of “design” and what it means in relation to this medium, and then take another look at what Shaun’s trying to accomplish here.

Author
Dan Rubin
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 11:12 am
042

Hey Shaun, fantastic idea on visual aging! Very inspiring! :-)

Author
Faruk Ateş
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 11:22 am
043

I feel good, now, with your site. I don’t know why, but the other felt ‘bad’, as a human feeling, while this is more like ‘you’. I can’t define exactly what I mean.

However, you’re always a step beyond. I started a though like this a while ago (the minimalistic style was already there) but you’re already there.

I’m waiting for the platform hints. :)

Author
Folletto Malefico
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 11:22 am
044

Well it’s nice to see evolution. Always makes the day more interesting. I had not heard of Markdown I do so love learning something new. Thank you sir, nice job on the site, always a pleasure.

Author
Jason Campbell
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:02 pm
045

Wow… nice concept shaun… How you thought of this is beyond me. Only problem is, as Dan Rubin stated now i will be unable to get any work done!

Author
Dave Sherratt
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:10 pm
046

I’m overly impressed. Inspiring, admirable work. I heart it!

Author
Mikkel Malmberg
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:20 pm
047

Fascinating idea, incredibly well-implimented. I’ve had ideas like this in the past, but never a good sense of how to even begin creating the backend for this (much less thinking of creating thousands of style sheets). Very impressed!

Author
Benjamin Chait
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:26 pm
048

When i first saw this i thought “all those late nights coding has finally driven him insain” but upon reading the read me and looking arround i think this is great. As a designer of course i was a bit disappointed seeing this, but like Dan said i had to stop and rethink what design is and as a budding developer myself looking at this progrmatically, this is AWESOME.

cant say i would follow this road from a visual stand point but then why follow right? i think if this site is saying anything to anyone its saying to designers and developers to not be bound by your surroundings - meaning the current web trends - but be true to your own chord and feelings and come up with something that is truly unique and truly “you”.

thanks for this Shaun, not to be fanboyish but this really has helped me see something in myself that i have been suppressing in lue of being all web 2.0 trendy as of late.

Author
David Blanchet
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:32 pm
049

Sean, at the risk of throwing myself into the dirty ditch of passing-criticism-on-the-aesthetic, I’m afraid to say I must join those who are not fans of the site’s new look. That’s not to say I don’t admire what you’re doing, because I do (isn’t that why we’re all here in the first place?) and I think the concept behind what you’ve done is fantastic, but I wonder if it’d be better suited to a separate project (even a piece of ‘art’; let’s face it: others have declared art out of far less).

Depending on how you change the technology behind this (or even just the stylesheet(s)), my feelings could change, but I regulalry visit your site not just to see what you’ve written, but to marvel at the sheer beauty of your design. Sadly, this is not something the new version inspires me to do.

Please let me emphasise again that I think the theory behind The Heap is a great one, and my criticism is intended to be constructive only, but I wonder how this incarnation will stand the test of time (pun intended): It seems like the overtly large text, for example, is more of a radical reaction against your own well-known minimalism than an essential part of a redesign.

Sorry - I hope I this won’t offend…

Author
Elliot Jay Stocks
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:47 pm
050

Oh shit man. I love it. Can’t wait to see the SI framework.

Author
Wilson
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:57 pm
051

I loves me the big fonts and the idea of making the posts feel “organic” with the shifting color schemes. Definitely not the visual orgasm that I expected from the Inman, but I applaud you for just doing what you want.

Why no more sIFR? I’m still trying to get a grasp on that thing and you’re ditching it? What the heck do I do now?!

Author
Eric Lim
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 12:59 pm
052

I like it a lot, Shaun. Well done. If I had time-based content, I’d steal your fading idea right now! ;-)

Author
Scott McMillin
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 1:33 pm
053

This is a bit nice. Good job mate.

Author
Luke W
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 1:55 pm
054

Looks great - nice concept. I especially like it because I can read the text now.

Author
Stephen
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 2:05 pm
055

Nice work. Aging has been on my mind as well. I like this interpretation but I’m not sure an innocent passerby will explicitly know, because the page is more washed out, it’s old.

Author
Nathan Borror
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 2:15 pm
056

I’m trying very hard to keep the expletives out of this as I type, but: I love this design.

Insert sailor-talk where you see fit.

Author
Ethan
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 2:15 pm
057

Tim: I’ve long since switched to excerpts for my articles and all items in the These Links? Again? feed are external links so this definitely isn’t retaliation against those who read my feeds. Also “getting it” isn’t a prerequisite to consuming the content on the site. Understanding the concept just adds a little extra context.

Elliot: I’m not offended but I couldn’t disagree more. What better place for an “art project” than a personal site? Where else would I have 6 years of dated content to experiment with? If the audience that appreciated the previous version based solely on pixel-retentiveness wanders, so be it.

Eric: IFR was supposed to be a stopgap. Unfortunately, that gap doesn’t appear to be closing anytime soon. Rather than continue to live in denial I’ve decided to embrace the limitations of the medium. Same goes for using JavaScript to control layout.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 2:28 pm
058

Nice to see Markdown in the comments. I wonder why you’d want to store the comments Markdown-formatted in the database however — or even stranger: convert old HTML comments to Markdown. Wouldn’t it be faster if the comments were already in their HTML form?

About contrasts, that’s always tricky with dark colors because different screens have different gamma curves, and almost no one except design professionals calibrate their screen to compensate for that. By the way, playing with the brigthness of a screen to test contrasts will not work on an LCD; you need to test with different gamma correction values instead — by creating different ColorSync calibrated screen profiles with different gamma values for instance, or by using less precise tools to play with the gamma value (like my own).

About the visual design: I like it. The only downside is that it’s hard to read when I sand too low in front my iBook LCD screen. I guess I’ll just have to learn to stand properly in front of a computer. I prefer that still over the thinny-sized text of the last version.

Author
Michel Fortin
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 2:47 pm
059

Michel: I store comments as Markdown so comment text is in the same format as post text making editing simpler and so searching can be done against the actual content of a comment, rather than content plus HTML markup. This allows searching for HTML code samples in comments without worrying about false positives from the comment’s own markup.

I also store a rendered HTML version when the comment is created or edited so the server isn’t running Markdown a hundred times a page.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 2:57 pm
060

I’m just curious to see how this plays out over your NEXT redesign. Any ideas yet?

Author
nleblanc
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:13 pm
061

I’ll admit my shock upon realising that this design was not infact a temporary, half finished sub-section of your website but (!) your website (!). Your work has always inspired me, with it’s attention to detail and boundry pushing nature.

But in this new design where is the beauty? Gone… or so it would seem at first glance. Throughout my maden visit I focused less on the design and - as you no doubt intended - more on the text content. What more could a website wish to achieve? I felt like reading on and on. Something about that huuuge text size perhaps.

I too love simplicity and focus in design. I put it into my own website in a way that reflects who I am. And in retrospect I love the new redesign, but in a different way from your old one. I love it’s concentrated focus on nothing more than the content that matters. I love the shunning of fancy effects and pretty pictures in exchange for bold contrasts and clear, almost hand-holding navigation. I love the total embrasement of ‘content is king’, and I love the single column layout.

Congratulations on a marvelous redesign Shaun.

Author
Steve Tucker
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:13 pm
062

Out of curiosity, why did you choose to generate the millions of stylesheets needed to simulate decay as opposed to running parameters through a PHP function that generates a stylesheet dynamically? Server load?

Author
John Whittet
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:13 pm
063

Shaun,

Can you explain the decision to create static css files instead of using Javascript tied into your aging algorithm?

Thanks.

Author
Nate Kresse
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:18 pm
064

nleblanc: Next redesign? Right now I’m more interested in evolving this design but I imagine that the concept of the passage of time will continue to permeate future versions.

John: Definitely server load (thirty-three thousand is not “millions”). List views (piles, searches, the homepage) can have as many as 20 color stylesheets loaded at a time. With comments a single post could have one to a hundred or more. Since I know the boundaries of what I want to display going in (366 days/hues * 91 tints) why not generate those files and save the server undue strain?

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:30 pm
065

“Web Two-point-no” Careful, you just might coin a new phrase. Yeah baby.

Author
nleblanc
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:34 pm
066

Nate: Simplicity. Restraint. Respect. The CSS is generated once. I don’t have to worry about JavaScript being enabled. I’m not putting undue stress on viewers’ browsers every page load potentially causing an unnecessary delay in the experience (see IFR, IPC, etc).

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:37 pm
067

About the million of stylesheets, I wonder how usefull it is really. The biggest advantage of an external stylesheet over embeded <style> elements is that it load only once, after that it’s already loaded and this pages are smaller and faster to load. If virtually each one of your pages has a different stylesheet, it makes no sense. It’s even worse because the browser has two files to retreive each time instead of one, and you’ll often get the (white) flash of unstyled content while navigating through the site. Is there a reason for not using <style>?

Author
Michel Fortin
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:39 pm
068

Shaun, you’re absolutely right - where else would you have 6 years of dated content to experiment with? I guess what I was thinking was that if it was a separate project, it could run in parallel to the actual site, acting more as a kind of mirror, simply sharing the same content. Maybe that’ll happen when the day comes to retire this particular version? It’ll certainly be interesting to see how it progresses.

Not sure what you mean by “if the audience that appreciated the previous version based solely on pixel-retentiveness wanders, so be it,” though - surely not a dig at those of us (most of us?) who come here to look at your beautiful designs? :-(

Author
Elliot Jay Stocks
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 3:48 pm
069

I don’t judge you on aesthetics at all.

Author
Blagoj
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:00 pm
070

absolutly stunning. I like the simplicity, easy read, and to the point… feels like it was built for speed.

Author
Josh
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:01 pm
071

Whew I like it,.. It would be great to make a “Back to footer” link heh coz I’m scrolling like hell here heh :)

Overall nice job Shaun, I digg the colors!

Author
Marko
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:01 pm
072

It took me a moment to grasp your new design. I’m not yet too sure how I like the time stamp machine idea. It has something very playful and philosophical and yet, the idea of a time machine, aging is something I do not connect with the written word. I am a literature geek and have studied literature at University. Written words, regardless of their importance or date of creation are ‘timeless’ in my opinion. With that said, I very much like the design as a whole. It’s refreshing, though I do find the side text to be too small and too dark for me to read (I’m on a Apple CD ‘23 and calibrated).

Author
Maleika E.A.
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:02 pm
073

If content will eventually go to white text on a white background…why not just delete the content from your database altogether? That’s a half-joke, but why not show it to the visitor?

Because something is old doesn’t mean it’s irrelevant. It certainly doesn’t mean it’s invisible.

I’m digging the “thinking out of the box”. With respect, I’m not digging the implementation.

Author
Eric Atkins
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:04 pm
074

Michel: The thousands of stylesheets are a server load consideration. The browser still has a chance to cache the stylesheets. Every post or comment on a single day shares the same stylesheet. When you load a list view you are essentially prefetching the stylesheet for any article you might click on. It’s six in one hand, half a dozen in the other. You either have a page load delay while the server computes the colors for every page or you have a delay in the browser while it fetches the other stylesheets.

Elliot: No, not a dig, just a colorful expression. I’m just saying that I’m not going to let the expectations of an arbitrary, anonymous group dictate how I design my personal site.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:09 pm
075

This is fantastic. Brilliant work. Great execution on a great idea.

Author
Joe Stewart
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:18 pm
076

I admire what you’ve done from several perspectives: pure design, the consideration of time and relevance, and actually doing the work to tie it all together.

Trouble is, time and relevance are not necessarily the same thing.

Something is relevant until it’s not (e.g., another IE hole gets patched), and even then it may regain relevance (e.g., yet another IE hole gets patched, and it undoes the first patch, which causes the latter to again become relevant).

Further, relevance generally follows the model of a roller coaster, as alluded to in the original post (e.g., humour “suddenly” isn’t funny). The lift to the top may be short (as in things that don’t much matter, like this response :) or not. Once at the top, the time to begin the downward journey may begin immediately (Zune ;) or not (a software technique replaced by another). Even the angle of the downward slope may vary.

All this to say, the only thing linear here is time, so I see the dimmer-with-time idea as tied only to time, not to relevance. I like the idea, both for its cleverness and for its artistic merit. As an illustration of my own innate lack of design, I would have expected age to bring about darkness, rather than step-into-the-light.

I very much appreciate the omission of JavaScript and other such “clever” devices, and the inclusion of large type.

I have only one question. I understand that a 90-year-old post will be white-on-white. Does the converse of this explain why the two links to the immediate right of the search box are black-on-black (er, dark olive on dark olive ;) ?

Author
Glenn
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:18 pm
077

I know it’s early days but do you have any ideas on how you plan to evolve this design?

Author
Steve Tucker
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:20 pm
078

The invisible links in the header will not fade with time. They will always be the same color. The hover state of those links will change though. They will always be the inverse of the background color.

The intent here is that once the content has faded to a point where it is difficult to read those links will have the contrast necessary to draw attention to themselves and offer assistance. Check out the 2001 archives for an example of the effect.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:30 pm
079

Nice work Shaun, way to keep the blog alive.

Author
Jane Doe
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:34 pm
080

Congratulations, great idea and also lots of balls to go ahead and ditch a look that had already been widely recognized.

I had thought of something similar. Of a design that allowed for seasonal changes. Originally I had thought it just to reflect the current season and then I thought of also the current holidays and finally of the current weather.

It obviously looked complex enough when I decided if I was going to try all that I might as well instill history in it and leave pages in the state they were when first published. Publish something in a rainy day in spring and it’ll stay that way. Publish something in a cold winter day and it’ll stay that way.

It never took off, obviously. I don’t have the skills and didn’t have the time back then. You’ve gone a similar route but, at the same time, a completely different goal. Instead of freezing pages in time you’re forcing them to age. Fantastic.

I applaud the idea and welcome thinking of design as something other than “what I’m seeing right now”. Too often we tend to neglect what we once did or how we’ll look what we do today in the future. Let’s hope this makes other people reconsider the position of their sites in the whole of time and the Internet. Your idea places each of your pages as a birth at the time of their conception and each will age accordingly. That places them in time. Glenn’s idea above could be interpreted as applying design to a page depending on its relevance (reflected back in itself depending on a number of factors, like incoming views and backlinks) in a spot relative to the rest of the site. Other ideas might pop up which could instill more personality to the writing itself (and less to the “container” that holds them).

When I last changed my theme I thought it was unfair that my older posts changed back as well. I truly believe the design you have heavily influences the way you write and the final result. Changing the result with retroactive effects changes the atmosphere which brought those writings in the first time and they start looking mightily out of place in the context of the new design.

I don’t know, I don’t think I could read one of my late-80s macworld magazines using the modern magazine’s layout and think of it as the same thing. Stupid example, probably, but helps my point.

Congratulations, again.

PS: Someone had to stop the one-up wars as well for coming up with the niftiest, greatest gimmick. I applaud that as well.

Author
Eduo
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:41 pm
081

My jaw dropped several times while reading about your redesign, just for the sheer unconventionality of your approach. It’s an astounding way to think about the relevance of your own words, but at the same time imposes your rather undifferentiated perception of relative importance, timeliness and urgency on your readers. I can’t even begin to tell you how many times I’ve found help, crucial information and even inspiration in years-old, throw-away comments on personal websites, forums, and usenet archives.

If you keep your posts online, you will constantly be indexed and subsequently searched for a long time to come. People mostly search for topics that interest them at the time of the search, so an arcane system of colour-coding will not be of much relevance to your incoming searchers, even if they bother to study the read-me…

Apart from these concerns, the quality of implementation is superb, and I thoroughly enjoy looking at your new design. I particularly appreciate that it is virtually devoid of arcane pixel-pushery and concentrates on readable content.

Author
Michael Ströck
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:43 pm
082

I am excited to see what sprouts after this compost rich in conceptual nutrients is spread over the patchwork fields of the internet.

Another appliction of this concept could be social relevance. What if a post that receives less attention (i.e. comments, addendum, etc.) faded faster, and posts that receive greater attention was emboldened. I am thinking of a site like A List Apart.

On ALA, a new article is published and read by a few billion people shortly there after. Then it begins to fade from the community’s memory. Different topics take longer to fade than others, but what if articles that get rediscovered and begin to receive fresh attention begin to reinvigorate visually.

It would be a way of addressing the Paris Hilton vs. Aristotle concern.

Also, re: Cameron Moll’s wicked worn:

Imagine an alternate universe, where the web has amazing typographic abilities paired with endless typeface options … I know it is hard, just imagine.

Why? Well once upon a time a typographer created a font family that randomly altered its letter-forms each time the document was printed (i.e. converted to PostScript for the printer). I have long forgotten who this was, but the output was chunky, mangled, distressed, and always different on the most grainular level.

So what if you could program decomposition of the letter-forms themselves into the sites aging algorithms. The letters would fracture, disintegrate, maybe even in response to some amazing heat mapping. Letters and links more frequently moused over would deteriorate more quickly.

Thanks for launching me on a train of thought I would have otherwise missed out on. Fresh thinking in the form of decomposition. Such an oddly great package.

Again, excellent work Shaun.

Author
Rian Murnen
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:49 pm
083

Wow, i think the aging concept is brilliant and in keeping with your string of redesign freshness. Truly inspiring.

Although I appreciate the rebellion against the “whiteness” that has been so present in web design lately, there’s something about the layout that leaves me a bit confused and disoriented. Can’t really get a strong sense of where I am or where I want to go.

Maybe I just need more coffee.

Author
Beckley
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:54 pm
084

Ahh, now I’ve tried it in Firefox, I like it. In recent WebKit builds it’s practically unreadable - the font-weight is way too light. It’s fine in plain old Safari, though…

Author
Jon
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 4:57 pm
085

Yeah. Why not. While identity seeks stability, it is action that forms identity ;)

Author
Jens Meiert
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 5:12 pm
086

This is Freakin AWESOME!

I can’t wait to revisit the site and see the site age…

Author
Shane Guymon
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 5:18 pm
087

This is a very clever idea, but I think it has some flaws. First of all, the font is too big. The negative space is really confusing, instead of helpful. The post text and the comment’s text are only differentiated by a couple points on the font size, so scrolling around to find what you want is tricky. Also, scrolling is not so fun, and the large text size really makes these pages - 80 something comments long - huge. The contrast in the “current” pages (newer/recent posts) is very low, I’d expect something easier to read too. And the hue change on the old pages, like back in the 2001 archives, the difference is very subtle.

I hope this turns out to be a very nice experiment Shaun, but I must be honest with you, it looks very bland and empty.

Author
Fernando Lins
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 5:31 pm
088

Let it be known that you are nothing short of a genious. Brilliant idea, sick realisation and the aesthetics (the wonderful hues, masterful typography) makes me want to jump with joy. This site goes perfect with the song Hot Chip - Just Like We (Break down) DFA Remix. Thanks for making my evening!

Author
Marcus
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 5:55 pm
089

WoW first time I have ever been to your site and at first without reading I couldn’t understand what was so amazing that my friends made me check it out, but now I sit here in envy. Nice Job

Author
Charles
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 6:22 pm
090

Only you could pull something like this off Shaun. Fantastico!

Author
Sam Brown
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 7:16 pm
091

stylegala.com/news/public200610/2315.htm#comment8

another comment i made about the site which i though would be relevent here, please excuse the spelling

Author
David Blanchet
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 10:17 pm
092

P.S. not to argue with you with someone elses comments, but come on now, all of us are arbitrary, anonymous group unless you know us personanlly, which i very much doubt, please dont go insulting us, i have in the past come to your site for visual inspiration and as i have delved into server side coding more my mind set has switched a bit and i can appreciate this energy that you have put into the site, but you should still be mindfull that you do have an audience. and i would not simply go calling people arbitrary, anonymous, when those people make up the majority of that audience.

I agree, do what you want with your own site, but you I know you understand that you are only as famous as the arbitrary and anonymous make you. and thats not a dig at you at all, im jsut saying be humble, you have been all along, dont start getting grouchy on us now =)

Author
David Blanchet
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 10:40 pm
093

David, calling an audience “arbitrary and anonymous” is not meant as an insult. 40k unique visitors a month is a massively anonymous number by any individual’s standards. Those that manage to discover this site do so largely by seven degrees of chance. I’m not trying to take anything but a humble tone here.

I think if anyone needs to reconsider how they are approaching this redesign it’s those who are acting as if they are entitled to the qualities that endeared them to the previous designs.

I appreciate that it’s the audience that made me what I am—in the eyes of that audience. But in the end I’m still just some guy who spends way too much time in front of a computer. I’m not in it for the celebrity or the audience, I’m in it to do the things that interest me. I respect that a large part of that audience’s interests are not going to shift at the same time as mine (or possibly ever). All I’m trying to say is that I’m comfortable with that.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 17th, 2006 11:20 pm
094

This is certainly very interesting and thought provoking.

The use of aging content through subtle visual cues is exactly the approach discussed in the Boxes and Arrows article from a few weeks back. boxesandarrows.com/view/ambient_signifi

If you haven’t read it you might find it interesting in retrospect. Oh and I wrote it. ;)

Author
Ross Howard
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 12:06 am
095

No harm no foul, i just read that and was like ‘what?!?’. fwiw i totally understand/respect/agree with you on it.

“But in the end I’m still just some guy who spends way too much time in front of a computer”

You and me both, i wish i had 40k visitors to interact with… actually logopond does, but thats a bit different =)

Author
David Blanchet
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 12:07 am
096

Well, normally contrast this low isn’t readable… but the font is so big it doesn’t matter. It’s everything we thought wouldn’t work, but does….

I’m just wondering if you’re actually going to follow through with it, or if we’ll be seeing another redesign in two years ;)

Author
Dustin Diaz
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 2:20 am
097

Wow! It’s a completely new vision. I like it. Design is a kind of mind-art and suppose to reflect our feelings and it’s different everyday. With this new vision (i think), you bring more closer the web and the user.

Author
Patrick Bouchard
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 4:25 am
098

I appreciate that it’s the audience that made me what I am—in the eyes of that audience. But in the end I’m still just some guy who spends way too much time in front of a computer. I’m not in it for the celebrity or the audience, I’m in it to do the things that interest me. I respect that a large part of that audience’s interests are not going to shift at the same time as mine (or possibly ever). All I’m trying to say is that I’m comfortable with that.

Nicely said, Shaun, and great idea, this is.

Author
Mike Papageorge
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 4:37 am
099

heh. “piles”.

nice work as always, Shaun.

Author
yongfook
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 5:05 am
100

I think this is a great idea!

Not to be an insensitive clod or anything, but— Have you seen how this looks on windows? On my mac it’s beautiful, on windows the font, to put it nicely, kind of ruins the experience. Maybe it’s just me?

Author
WY
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 5:36 am
101

I’m intrigued - how did you create so many CSS files? Was it a PHP script that looped through the various settings, writing a file at a time?

Very interesting idea and I can see that it could be a good visual indicator for some sites. Of course, it may also present some accessibility issues depending on the level of contrast. I had to say that - obliged to ;-)

Author
Ian Lloyd
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 5:48 am
102

Nah! the text should just get bigger as time goes by.

It gets harder to see as you get older (as I am apparantly finding out).

Seriously interesting concept.

Author
r
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 7:25 am
103

“Thirty-three thousand, three hundred and six 1 KB CSS files. One for each day of the year…for the next ninety-one years”

Love the concept and new design, but 33,306 css files! Holy moley! Couldn’t you have written some PHP to generate and declare your CSS inline instead of externally, based on the age of each post? Or am I missing something here?

Author
Nick
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 8:53 am
104

Ian: Yup, I wrote a simple PHP script that loops through the possible 366 days of the year, generating a hue (and the full color palette based on that hue) for each. Within that loop it enters another loop that generates 91 tints of that color palette (0-90, 0 being full “opacity”, 90 resulting an a nearly white-on-white color palette). The colors are then inserted into a CSS template and saved to disk.

I then zipped up the /z/ folder that contained all 33,306 files and uploaded the 16 MB archive to the server and unzipped. Of course that was after bone-headedly trying to upload the directory without zipping it. I knew it would take a while so I started it before going to bed the night before I launched. 12 hours later it still had 60 days (each with 90 years of stylesheets) to go!

Nick: Not to be rude but yes, you are missing something. Why should anyone else read your comment if you don’t take the time to read theirs?

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 9:09 am
105

Thanks for the kick, Shaun; I’d missed that the first scan through. Forgive me for delving further, but wouldn’t a PHP caching engine like Zend accelerator (or ionCube’s free version) that come preinstalled on most hosting packages potentially negate the need to compute the colors for every page a second time, making it a better choice over the thousands upon thousands of CSS files you’re challenging the server with?

I’ll quit trying to be a smartarse and just enjoy the pretty colours now.

Author
Nick
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 9:16 am
106

shaun, information architecture wise, you totally get it.

i suspect the current implementation is a bit clumsy. i guess you’re generating more colours than the human eye can distinguish on a standard monitor. (when two splotches of colour are an inch apart, no one can tell that #A02060 is any different from #A02061. when they are directly conjoined … well, it’s still too tiny a distinction to care about.)

twenty CSS files (and thus HTTP requests) for one page sounds excessive; i bet your server won’t melt if you precalculate just the colours, attach them to the respective data items, and combine the respective CSS definitions into one file on the fly. also, it’s a must to not rely on javascript, but you could still write a script that, if executed, kicks those external CSS references out of the DOM and instead amends the standard style sheet.

but what the hell, it seems to be working good enough and the result is wonderful. i’m just a hopeless perfectionist …

Author
nex
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 11:15 am
107

Shaun, I think I am inside the Amazones. Covered by leaves of the branches that stretch way up high. It is a minimalist design which has the Mint tones.

The only thing that is reminscent of day one, say incarnation #1. That are pixel fonts and your beautiful crafted signature logo.

Can I have a mint?

Author
Johan
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 2:13 pm
108

What a wonderful idea for a redesign! I am impressed.

Author
Travis
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 2:36 pm
109

ideas and events fading away over time… the visual nature of the concept is interesting, but what does that say on a more profound level; a political level, perhaps?

Author
sean coon
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 4:02 pm
110

In an act of auto-ethnography, I realized that within seconds of looking at your site and reading your post, I was no longer hunched over my desk, with my face scrunched up close to my monitor. Instead, I had instinctively leaned back in my chair—way back—to a more comfortable, but less bright, three-foot reading distance.

It’s odd what oversized type does to the reader!

Maybe what’s needed is a two-pronged user-controlled approach: a contrast-o-meter that maintains the hue / sat, but adjusts the relative brightness of the text vs. the bg, as well as a size-o-meter that maintains the characters per line and vertical rhythm relationships, but adjust the relative scale of the text.

In any case, I dig this look. It’s almost like a blogospheric web-2.0 tribute to the ol’ Praystation 1.0 look, notably using Helvetica Neue instead of Arial Bold!

Lastly, if I can lend you some of what I learned from my own time-based design variation: no one gets it at first. But over time, they notice, and you notice too, and it’s a great way to keep things fresh without having to do anything! (hint: the background colour of the loading screen in my link is different every day of the year, using a 365-frame flash color tween! easy!)

Author
Damer
Posted
Oct 18th, 2006 8:43 pm
111

Beautiful. Time, however, is a loop.

Author
moebius
Posted
Oct 19th, 2006 12:17 am
112

Hmm…interesting. I hope the concept of design hasn’t been convoluted down into an action merely performed for the sake of performing the action. Mixed feelings about the site, Shaun. I would like to say the previous version (8, I suppose), was effective in that it was pleasing, inviting, relaxing, and conveying in manner of the points you wanted put forth (I assume), and the points you wanted more to act like condiments at a dinner table.

Do you like this site for the design, or do you like it for the resignation of contemporary design. Unique and in-your-face ideals, however seemingly ingeniously and self-complimentingly clever as they may be, are only as valuable as the targeted audience and the feelings they contribute (I’m acting here under the, I think, correct assumption you care what your readers think).

Perhaps I’m just a bit frustrated with the overwhelmingly putrid stench that seems to be permeating the internet as of late. In my opinion (2 cents poorer than when I started this comment), you’re contributing more to Web 2.0 than you ever could have with an Ajax friendly, light, smooth contrasting website. Perhaps not necessarily the DESIGN of Web 2.0, but certainly the drive. Be influential. Be unique. Take initiative. But please don’t confuse side-stepping with back-stepping.

Perhaps my mixed feelings are merely aimed at Web 2.0, and I’m totally wrong in that I’m flogging (in the most civilized and respectful way possible) the messenger for the opposing army. Where DO you stand on Web 2.0? And for the record, if there are any typos in this message, it’s because I can’t see the cursor against this green textarea background. I probably saw the typo, but didn’t dare attempt to move the cursor to the rogue letter’s location.

You are an excellent web designer, I was very impressed with the previous design, but I think you may have let your ambitious attempt at fixing the internet get the better of you with this one. I hope this doesn’t sound like hate-mail posing as a blog comment, just an opinion, more or less. It’s sometimes hard to convey intention simply through text on a computer screen, especially when there is no tone of voice or facial expressions involved (and smileys are out of the question…OUT, of the question).

Send me an e-mail if somehow this has sparked your curiosity or you’d like to talk more about what I mean. At any rate, I always enjoy reading your blog posts. Again, I’d hate to come off as sounding rebuking or condescending, that is in absolutely no way my intention(s). That would seem almost humorously ineffective considering I’m talking to a man that makes his living working with design.

Author
Jon E.
Posted
Oct 19th, 2006 12:57 am